• Published on June 14, 2024
    The 56th session of the UN Human Rights Council will take place from 18 June to 12 July 2024. Below you can find information about: Anticipated sexual rights-related resolutions, panels and reports UPR outcomes SRI’s side event taking place during the 56th session
  • Published on June 14, 2024
    La sesión 56° del Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU se desarrollará del 18 de junio al 12 de julio de 2024. A continuación, podrán encontrar información sobre: Resoluciones, paneles e informes previstos relacionados con derechos sexuales Resultados del EPU Evento virtual de la Iniciativa por los Derechos Sexuales (SRI) durante la sesión 56°
  • Acción en Canadá por la Salud y los Derechos Sexuales

    Acción en Canadá por la Salud y los Derechos Sexuales  es comprometida con la defensa y el avance de la salud y los derechos sexuales y reproductivos (SDSR) en Canadá y en el mundo. Action Canada trabaja para incrementar el acceso a información y servicios en salud sexual y reproductiva; informar a actores gubernamentales y no gubernamentales para lograr avances en DSR; y apoyar a movimientos que promueven una agenda amplia e interseccional de SDSR. 

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    Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights logo
    Active partner
    Yes
    Partner website
  • Действие Канады за Сексуальное Здоровье и Права, далее Действие Канады

    Действие Канады за Сексуальное Здоровье и Права, далее Действие Канады (Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights) - это прогрессивная благотворительная организация, выступающая за свободу выбора, которая занимается защитой и поддержкой сексуального и репродуктивного здоровья и прав (СРЗП) как в Канаде, так и во всем мире. Действие Канады работает над расширением доступа к информации и услугам СРЗП, неформальными и неправительственными субъектами, занимающимися защитой сексуальных прав, и содействует продвижению повестки дня во вопросам касающимся СРЗП. Действие Канада работает в Совете по Gравам Человека с 2002 года.

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    Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights logo
    Active partner
    Yes
    Partner website
  • Action Canada pour la santé et les droits sexuels

    Action Canada pour la santé et les droits sexuels est voué à la promotion et à la défense de la santé et des droits sexuels et génésiques au Canada et dans le monde. Action Canada travaille à améliorer l’accès à l’information et aux services matière de santé sexuelle et génésique; à différents acteurs afin de promouvoir les droits sexuels et génésiques; et à soutenir des mouvements intersectionnels pour faire progresser les droits sexuels et génésiques.

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    Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights logo
    Active partner
    Yes
    Partner website
  • Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights

    Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights is a progressive, pro-choice charitable organization committed to advancing and upholding sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) in Canada and globally. Action Canada works to increase access to SRHR information and services, inform governmental and non-governmental actors for the advancement of sexual rights, and support movements to advance a broad and intersectional SRHR agenda. Action Canada has been working at the Human Rights Council since 2002.

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    Action Canada for Sexual Health and Rights logo
    Active partner
    Yes
    Partner website
  • UN Mechanisms

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    Diagram of all the UN Mechanisms

    The SRI works with the four main UN human rights mechanisms: the Human Rights Council, the Universal Periodic Review, the Special Procedures and the Treaty Monitoring Bodies. Learn about these mechanisms and what they do.


     

    Introduction

    The UN human rights system is a collection of mechanisms that work together to:

    • Hold States accountable for their human rights obligations

    • Discuss and take action on human rights concerns around the world
    • Set standards for the promotion, protection, and fulfillment of human rights

    The SRI works with the four main UN human rights mechanisms:

    • The Human Rights Council
    • The Universal Periodic Review
    • The Treaty Monitoring Bodies
    • The Special Procedures
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    The Human Rights Council auditorium

     

    Human Rights Council

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    The Human Rights Council is the foremost inter-governmental body charged with protecting and promoting human rights.

    47 UN Member States are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve on the Human Rights Council for a three-year term. All 193 UN Member States can participate in the proceedings of the Human Rights Council; however, only the 47 Members are entitled to vote on actions to be taken.

    The Human Rights Council is mandated to:

    • Engage governments, civil society, and experts to debate, discuss, and adopt resolutions on thematic and country-specific human rights concerns.
    • Appoint Special Procedures to analyze and report on human rights related to particular themes and in specific countries.
    • Assess the human rights records of all 193 UN Member States through the Universal Periodic Review.
    • Examine human rights violation complaints.

    The Human Rights Council meets three times a year for regular sessions in March, June, and September at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.

    To learn more about the Human Rights Council, please visit its website or watch this video produced by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

    Click here to learn more about our work at HRC


     

    Universal Periodic Review

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    The Universal Periodic Review is an inter-governmental process where each of the 193 UN Member States are reviewed on their entire human rights record every four and a half years.

    All UN Member States are reviewed on an equal basis and with the same frequency. States under review are provided an opportunity to update the UN Human Rights Council on the steps taken to fulfill their human rights obligations at the national level. During this process, UN Member States also make recommendations to the State under review to improve the implementation of human rights obligations at the national level.

    To learn more about the Universal Periodic Review, please visit its website or watch this video produced by UPR-Info.

    Click here to review a collection of the SRI’s collaborative UPR stakeholder submissions.

    Click here to learn more about our work at the UPR


     

    Special Procedures

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    UN Special Procedures are human rights experts appointed by the UN Human Rights Council to investigate, analyze and report on thematic or country-specific human rights concerns.

    UN Special Procedures can take the form of Special Rapporteurs, Independent Experts, or Working Groups. The Special Procedures submit annual reports to the Human Rights Council, respond to communications of urgent human rights violations, undertake country visits, and contribute to the development of international human rights norms and standards.

    To learn more about the Special Procedures, please visit their website or watch this video produced by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

    Click here to learn more about our work at the Special Procedures


     

    Treaty Monitoring Bodies

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    The Treaty Monitoring Bodies are committees of independent experts that monitor the implementation of international human rights treaties.

    When States ratify a human rights treaty, they agree to periodically report to the respective Committee on the steps taken to ensure everyone in the State can enjoy the rights set out in the treaty. The Treaty Monitoring Bodies also develop and adopt General Comments or Recommendations to guide States in the implementation of the obligations set out in the human rights treaties.

    To learn more about the Treaty Monitoring Bodies, please visit their website or watch this video produced by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

    Click here to learn more about our work at the Treaty Monitoring Bodies


     

  • landing page documentation

  • Treaty Monitoring Bodies

    SRI works at the UN Treaty Monitoring Bodies in partnership with national and regional civil society organisations and tracking recommendations made by treaty bodies on sexual rights. Committees assigned to a treaty will review its implementation by analysing reports submitted by States and contrasting that information with reports sent by civil society. 

    We prepare stakeholder submissions to Treaty Monitoring Bodies Committees and provide technical assistance to civil society organisations wishing to make submissions to Treaty Bodies. We also contribute to Committees' debates, discussions, and panels when there is an opportunity to do so. 


     


     

    Our Work on UN Treaty Bodies

    En el año que acaba de concluir, continuamos destacando el profundo impacto que tienen sobre los derechos sexuales las crisis globales interrelacionadas causadas por el capitalismo mediante el neoliberalismo rampante, el extractivismo sin control y la degradación del clima, el populismo y el nacionalismo violentos, la desigualdad cada vez mayor al interior de los estados y entre ellos, y los sistemas de opresión patriarcal, racista, de clase y capacitista profundamente arraigados. A continuación podrán leer lo más destacado de 2023 en el trabajo de la SRI.

    El presente informe alternativo al Comite de Derechos del Niño (CDN) de Naciones Unidas, para el examen de el Estado de Paraguay, es una contribución conjunta entre la Red Contra Todas Formas de Discriminación de Paraguay, la CDIA - Coordinadora por los Derechos de la Infancia y la Adolescencia de Paraguay, Akahatá - Equipo de trabajo en Sexualidades y Generos, SYNERGIA - Iniciativas para los Derechos Humanos y SRI - Sexual Rigths Iniciative; para el periodo de sesiones 95 del CDN.


     

    Submissions

    El presente informe alternativo al Comite de Derechos del Niño (CDN) de Naciones Unidas, para el examen de el Estado de Paraguay, es una contribución conjunta entre la Red Contra Todas Formas de Discriminación de Paraguay, la CDIA - Coordinadora por los Derechos de la Infancia y la Adolescencia de Paraguay, Akahatá - Equipo de trabajo en Sexualidades y Generos, SYNERGIA - Iniciativas para los Derechos Humanos y SRI - Sexual Rigths Iniciative; para el periodo de sesiones 95 del CDN.


     

    What are UN Treaty Bodies?

    The Treaty Monitoring Bodies are committees of independent experts that monitor the implementation of international human rights treaties.

    When States ratify a human rights treaty, they agree to periodically report to the respective Committee on the steps taken to ensure everyone in the State can enjoy the rights set out in the treaty. The Treaty Monitoring Bodies also develop and adopt General Comments or Recommendations to guide States in the implementation of the obligations set out in the human rights treaties.

    To learn more about the Treaty Monitoring Bodies, please visit their website or watch this video produced by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

  • Special Procedures

    SRI engages with the UN Special Procedures to influence the content of their thematic work and reports. As independent experts, Special Procedures have a particular role to play in echoing feminist analysis and demands and are sometimes able to do so more freely than other human rights mechanisms. We work in this context to bring an intersectional approach that includes sexual rights and foregrounds a Global South perspective to thematic mandates in their contributions to the development of norms and standards. 

    We engage with Special Procedures by making submissions to their thematic reports. We also contribute to the debates, discussions and panels with independent experts at the Human Rights Council. We participate in their consultations and connect them with activists at the national level when they undertake country visits. Finally, we support organisations and activists who want to make a complaint through the communication procedure.


     

    Submissions

    No content available.

     

    Statements

    En el año que acaba de concluir, continuamos destacando el profundo impacto que tienen sobre los derechos sexuales las crisis globales interrelacionadas causadas por el capitalismo mediante el neoliberalismo rampante, el extractivismo sin control y la degradación del clima, el populismo y el nacionalismo violentos, la desigualdad cada vez mayor al interior de los estados y entre ellos, y los sistemas de opresión patriarcal, racista, de clase y capacitista profundamente arraigados. A continuación podrán leer lo más destacado de 2023 en el trabajo de la SRI.

    En respuesta a la posición nociva de la Relatora Especial de la ONU sobre la violencia contra las mujeres y las niñas, Reem Alsalem, contra el reconocimiento legal del género a través de la autoidentificación, la Iniciativa por los Derechos Sexuales (SRI) ha decidido dejar de relacionarse con esta titular de mandato y alienta a otras organizaciones feministas y activistas a hacer lo mismo.

    Entre una sesión del Consejo de Derechos Humanos y la siguiente, activistas, movimientos y organizaciones pueden continuar haciendo incidencia de muchas maneras diferentes en el sistema de derechos humanos de la ONU.


     

    Thematic work on special procedures

    While we cover a range of topics related to sexual rights, our current focus through the Special Procedures currently covers the following themes:


     

    Latest news on Special Procedures

    Opportunities for feminist engagement in the UN human rights system

    You'll find in this post the most recent opportunities for feminist engagement in the UN human rights system from February to April 2024.

    Published on February 08, 2024

    2023 In Review

    Last year, our work continued to highlight how sexual rights are profoundly impacted by the interrelated global crises brought on by capitalism through rampant neoliberalism, unchecked extractivism and climate degradation, violent populism and nationalism, soaring inequality within and between states, and entrenched patriarchal, racist, classist and ableist systems of oppression. Read below for our highlights of 2023.

    Published on February 12, 2024


     

    What are Special Procedures?

    UN Special Procedures are human rights experts appointed by the UN Human Rights Council to investigate, analyse and report on thematic or country-specific human rights concerns.

    UN Special Procedures can take the form of Special Rapporteurs, Independent Experts, or Working Groups. The Special Procedures submit annual reports to the Human Rights Council, respond to communications of urgent human rights violations, undertake country visits, and contribute to developing international human rights norms and standards.

    To learn more about the Special Procedures, please visit their website or watch this video produced by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

  • Sexual Rights at the United Nations Human Rights Council

    SRI as a feminist coalition has participated in every regular session of the Council since its formation. SRI works at the Human Rights Council to bring a feminist and intersectional approach to sexuality and gender while foregrounding the voices of the Global South. We do this through advocacy with member states, UN mechanisms and agencies. Each session, we engage the council’s debates, discussions and panels through statements, often written and delivered in collaboration with activists and other civil society organisations. We also provide workshops and trainings to organisations and activists interested in engaging with the council. Finally, we contribute to developing knowledge on sexual rights by organising events and panels, organising campaigns and creating and sharing knowledge resources. 

    At the HRC, we:

    • Support the individual and collective power of feminist and SRHR advocates, particularly from the Global South, to (re)claim this space for accountability and justice
    • Engage with states to shore up support, leadership and positive engagement on SRHR issues. 
    • Engage with various stakeholders (states, UN agencies, civil society organisations and activists) in the Council to better integrate an intersectional, decolonial, and economic justice approach to SRHR.

    This work intersects with the Special Procedures when they report to the Council and the Universal Periodic Review. 


     

    Videos

    How is the Human Rights Council useful for activists:

    The Political Context of Human Rights at the HRC:


     

    Our work at the HRC

    24 de junio de 2024 – 15 a 16 horas (hora de Ginebra) En persona: Sala XXV, Palais des Nations
    La sesión 56° del Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU se desarrollará del 18 de junio al 12 de julio de 2024. A continuación, podrán encontrar información sobre: Resoluciones, paneles e informes previstos relacionados con derechos sexuales Resultados del EPU Evento virtual de la Iniciativa por los Derechos Sexuales (SRI) durante la sesión 56°
    Súmense a nosotres para este evento paralelo que va a situar los derechos sexuales y la autonomía corporal en contextos sociales y políticos, subrayando que no existe ninguna jerarquía de derechos.
    Join us for this side-event that will examine the connections between macroeconomics and sexual and reproductive health and rights, as well as responses by different human rights actors.

     

    Our latest statements

    Las trabajadoras sexuales ejercemos nuestro derecho a la autonomía corporal y al trabajo. Sin embargo, enfrentamos cotidianamente la vulneración de derechos, esto compromete nuestra integridad, nuestra libertad y en muchos casos nuestras vidas.
    El informe señala que el gasto militar de los Estados del norte global refleja sus prioridades y su desdén por los derechos humanos básicos. Recordamos a esos Estados que su asistencia militar y exportaciones de armas están colaborando con el genocidio del pueblo palestino en Gaza, violando las medidas provisorias ordenadas por la Corte Internacional de Justicia.

    En apoyo al próximo Día Internacional del Aborto Seguro que se celebrará el 28 de septiembre, la Iniciativa por los Derechos Sexuales (SRI); la Coalición por la Justicia Sexual y Reproductiva (Sexual and Reproductive Justice Coalition); el Centro de Derechos Reproductivos (Center for Reproductive Rights); el Centro de Recursos e Investigaciones sobre la Mujer de Asia y el Pacífico (Asian-Pacific Resource and Research Centre for Women); la Asociación para los Derechos de la Mujer en el Desarrollo (Association for Women’s Rights in Development), CHOICE for Youth and Sexuality, IPPF, Ipas, el Servicio Internacional para los Derechos Humanos (International Service for Human Rights), la Coalición de Jóvenes por los Derechos Sexuales y Reproductivos (Youth Coalition for Sexual and Reproductive Rights) y la Asociación Sueca para la Educación Sexual (Swedish Association for Sexuality Education) han elaborado una declaración conjunta sobre el derecho al aborto que se presentará en el 45º período de sesiones del Consejo de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, en Ginebra.

    Apreciamos el compromiso de Argentina con el mecanismo del EPU y el apoyo de las recomendaciones relacionadas con los derechos sexuales recibidas. Particularmente aquellas relacionadas con los derechos de las personas LGBTI y las actuaciones del sistema judicial en investigaciones independientes, imparciales y transparentes.

     

    UN Advocacy tool

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    This tool is a collaborative project by Fòs Feminista and the Sexual Rights Initiative. It aims to facilitate access for advocates and delegates to UN intergovernmental resolutions, expert guidance, and technical information in order to advance sexual and reproductive health and rights at the global level and hold governments accountable for their international obligations and commitments.

    This tool includes two sections:

    A searchable database of adopted intergovernmental documents and of expert guidance related to sexual and reproductive health and rights,

    A curated list of key sexual and reproductive health and rights terms with selected examples of agreed language and additional guidance, definitions and resources.

    Consult the UN Advocacy tool


     

    What is the Human Rights Council?

    The Human Rights Council, an intergovernmental mechanism made up of 47 UN member states, was created by the General Assembly in 2006 to strengthen the promotion and protection of human rights across the globe and address human rights violations and make recommendations. The HRC can discuss either thematic or country-specific issues. The human rights council has three regular sessions every year and special sessions for urgent situations. 

    47 UN Member States are elected by the UN General Assembly to serve on the Human Rights Council for a three-year term. All 193 UN Member States can participate in the proceedings of the Human Rights Council; however, only the 47 Members are entitled to vote on actions to be taken.

    The Human Rights Council is mandated to:

    • Engage governments, civil society, and experts to debate, discuss, and adopt resolutions on thematic and country-specific human rights concerns.
    • Appoint Special Procedures to analyze and report on human rights related to particular themes and in specific countries.
    • Assess the human rights records of all 193 UN Member States through the Universal Periodic Review.
    • Examine human rights violation complaints.

    The Human Rights Council meets three times a year for regular sessions in March, June, and September at the United Nations Office in Geneva, Switzerland.

    To learn more about the Human Rights Council, please visit its website or watch this video produced by the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

  • Universal Periodic Review

    The SRI works at the UN Universal Periodic Review by collaborating with national and regional organisations and coalitions on stakeholder submissions. These submissions touch on a number of different sexual and reproductive health and rights issues affecting the country under review, such as abortion, sex work, access to contraception, and rights related to sexual orientation, gender identity, and expression.

    The UPR provides an opportunity for civil society organisations (CSOs) to engage in advocacy at the United Nations. CSOs can submit stakeholder submissions advocating for improved human rights conditions in their country, including on issues of sexual and reproductive health and rights.


     

    The Universal Periodic Review: A Powerful Tool for Advancing Sexual Rights


     

    Our Work at the UPR

    La 46.ª sesión del Examen Periódico Universal se llevará a cabo del 29 de abril al 10 de mayo de 2024. Todas las sesiones del Examen se transmitirán en vivo por la Web TV de la ONU. Durante la sesión se examinarán 14 países: Nueva Zelanda, Afganistán, Chile, Chipre, Uruguay, Yemen, Vanuatu, Macedonia del Norte, Comoras, Eslovaquia, Eritrea, Vietnam, República Dominicana y Camboya.
    Las trabajadoras sexuales ejercemos nuestro derecho a la autonomía corporal y al trabajo. Sin embargo, enfrentamos cotidianamente la vulneración de derechos, esto compromete nuestra integridad, nuestra libertad y en muchos casos nuestras vidas.
    En el año que acaba de concluir, continuamos destacando el profundo impacto que tienen sobre los derechos sexuales las crisis globales interrelacionadas causadas por el capitalismo mediante el neoliberalismo rampante, el extractivismo sin control y la degradación del clima, el populismo y el nacionalismo violentos, la desigualdad cada vez mayor al interior de los estados y entre ellos, y los sistemas de opresión patriarcal, racista, de clase y capacitista profundamente arraigados. A continuación podrán leer lo más destacado de 2023 en el trabajo de la SRI.

    A continuación compartimos algo de lo más destacado en relación a los derechos sexuales para cada uno de los Estados examinados en la sesión 44° del EPU. En la lista también encontrarán las respuestas expresadas por los Estados hasta el momento. Observamos con preocupación el incremento en el número de recomendaciones formuladas por algunos Estados que piden reconocer y proteger a la familia como unidad natural de la sociedad.


     

    UPR Database

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    UPR Database

    The UPR Database, a project of the SRI, allows you to access and search all the sexual rights related recommendations and references made during the Universal Periodic Review.

    Consult the database.

    What is the Universal Periodic Review?

    The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) is an intergovernmental process in which each of the 193 UN Member States is reviewed on their entire human rights record every four and a half years. The UPR highlights actions that countries need to take to fulfil their agreed human rights obligations—these actions are presented as recommendations that states must accept or note.

    Explainer on Terminology

    • Accepted Recommendation: The state under review agrees to implement the recommendation
    • Deferred Recommendation: The state under review will announce in [later] if it agrees to implement the recommendation
    • Noted Recommendation: The state under review does not agree to implement the recommendation


    To learn more about the Universal Periodic Review, please visit its website or watch this video produced by UPR-Info.

  • Uploaded on April 29, 2024
    The 47th session of the Universal Periodic will take place from 4 to 15 November 2024. 14 Countries are under review during the session: Norway, Albania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Portugual, Bhutan, Dominica, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Brunei Darussalam, Costa Rics, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Qatar and Nicaragua. In collaboration with our partners, the SRI submitted reports for Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bhutan and Albania.
  • Published on April 26, 2024
    The 46th session of the Universal Periodic will take place from 29 April to 10 May 2024. All of the review sessions will be live-streamed on UN Web TV. 14 Countries are under review during the session: New Zealand, Afghanistan, Chile, Cyprus, Uruguay, Yemen, Vanuatu, North Macedonia, Comoros, Slovakia, Eritrea, Viet Nam, Dominican Republic and Cambodia.
  • Published on April 26, 2024
    La 46.ª sesión del Examen Periódico Universal se llevará a cabo del 29 de abril al 10 de mayo de 2024. Todas las sesiones del Examen se transmitirán en vivo por la Web TV de la ONU. Durante la sesión se examinarán 14 países: Nueva Zelanda, Afganistán, Chile, Chipre, Uruguay, Yemen, Vanuatu, Macedonia del Norte, Comoras, Eslovaquia, Eritrea, Vietnam, República Dominicana y Camboya.
  • Published on April 26, 2024
    La 46e session de l’Examen périodique universel aura lieu du 29 avril aud 10 mai 2024. Toutes les sessions d’examen seront diffusées en direct sur la Web TV de l'ONU. 14 pays font l'objet d'un examen au cours de la session : Nouvelle-Zélande, Afghanistan, Chili, Chypre, Uruguay, Yémen, Vanuatu, Macédoine du Nord, Comores, Slovaquie, Érythrée, Viet Nam, République dominicaine et Cambodge.
  • Published on April 10, 2024
    The 55th session of the UN Human Rights Council took place from 26 February to 5 April 2024. Due to the ongoing liquidity crisis experienced by the Council, civil society organisations were asked to pay for the use of hybrid modalities for their side events through the WebEX platform for the first time in the Council's history. This puts an additional and significant burden on organisations that have very limited budgets to engage with the HRC, which is deeply concerning.
  • Published on April 10, 2024
    La sesión 55° del Consejo de Derechos Humanos de la ONU transcurrió entre el 26 de febrero y el 5 de abril de 2024. Debido a la crisis de liquidez que vive el Consejo y por primera vez en la historia de este organismo, a las organizaciones de sociedad civil se les pidió que pagaran para poder utilizar las modalidades híbridas de la plataforma WebEX en sus eventos paralelos. Esto supuso una carga adicional y significativa para organizaciones cuyos presupuestos para participar en el CDH son muy limitados, lo que resulta sumamente preocupante.
  • Published on April 10, 2024
    Le Conseil des droits de l’homme (CDH) des Nations Unies a tenu sa 55e session du 26 février au 5 avril 2024. En raison de la crise de liquidités actuelle, les organisations de la société civile ont eu, pour la première fois de l’histoire du CDH, à payer pour utiliser des modalités hybrides pour leurs événements parallèles sur la plateforme WebEX. Cela impose une charge supplémentaire importante aux organisations qui ont un budget limité pour s’engager auprès du CDH – ce qui est très préoccupant.
  • Uploaded on April 09, 2024
    The 46th session of the Universal Periodic will take place from 29 April to 10 May 2024. 14 Countries are under review during the session: New Zealand, Afghanistan, Chile, Cyprus, Uruguay, Yemen, Vanuatu, North Macedonia, Comoros, Slovakia, Eritrea, Viet Nam, Dominican Republic and Cambodia. In collaboration with our partners, the SRI submitted reports for Cambodia and North Macedonia.
  • Uploaded on April 09, 2024
    The 45th session of the Universal Periodic was held from 22 January to 02 February 2024. 14 Countries were under review during the session: Saudi Arabia, Senegal, China, Nigeria Mauritius, Mexico, Jordan, Malaysia, Central African Republic, Monaco, Belize, Chad, Congo and Malta. In collaboration with our partners, the SRI submitted reports for Malaysia and Nigeria.
  • Published on March 25, 2024
    The implementation of these recommendations is especially urgent given the shortcomings of the Government’s engagement with civil society in this fourth UPR and its overall lack of accountability on international human rights compliance. These shortcomings include a lack of federal leadership, limited information accessibility, unequal opportunities for civil society participation, and no clear process for monitoring and follow up of recommendations.