Submissions

Uploaded on November 14, 2022

SRI, IWRAW Asia Pacific and AWID made a joint submission in response to the Working Group’s call for inputs on “Human security of women and girls in the context of poverty and inequality.” The submission advocates for an economic justice approach and class analysis of poverty and inequality.

Uploaded on November 03, 2022

The 41st session of the Universal Periodic review begins on the 7th of November 2022, and this session marks the beginning of the fourth cycle of the UPR. The working group session will take place from 7 November to 18 November 2022. 14 Countries will be under review during the session: Bahrain, Ecuador, Tunisia, Morocco, Indonesia, Finland, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, India, Brazil, Philippines, Algeria, Poland, Netherlands and South Africa. In collaboration with our partners, the SRI collaborated on reports for South Africa, India, Poland and the Netherlands.

Uploaded on August 23, 2022
The main argument of this submission is that a tripartite approach is necessary in order for states to meet their obligations under CERD Article 5 (e)(iv) concerning access to health and healthcare of all people.
Uploaded on December 15, 2022

Current discourse about the nature of sex work in Zambia and the experiences of sex workers is narrow. Discussions on laws criminalising sex work are often informed by arguments on morality. Morality is a complex and subjective issue, heavily informed by patriarchal, religious norms and standards - criminal laws must comply with international human rights standards.

Uploaded on December 15, 2022

2. This joint submission assesses the Zambian Government’s human rights record since the third cycle of UPR in 2017, and highlights some of the emerging or increasing challenges, especially in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. It specifically assesses Government’s fulfilment of adolescent and young people’s sexual reproductive health and rights, providing follow-up recommendations on key areas of concern Government should prioritise in the coming cycle.

Uploaded on December 15, 2022

This report is submitted by SEXUAL HEALTH Switzerland and the Sexual Rights Initiative. It examines the human rights situation in Switzerland, with a focus on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).

Uploaded on December 15, 2022

This joint stakeholder report assesses Pakistan’s progress since its third cycle review in meeting its obligations to respect, protect, and fulfill the sexual and reproductive health and rights obligations it has towards young people, particularly women and transgender persons. The submission focuses on access to safe abortion, the sexual rights of LGBT people, and access to sexual and reproductive health information, education and services.

Uploaded on December 15, 2022

2. This report is jointly submitted by nine (9) national, regional, and international civil organizations striving to promote SRHR. It highlights ongoing issues concerning SRHR in Japan with a focus on six (6) topics: access to contraceptives including emergency contraception, access to safe abortion, redress for victims of forced sterilization, discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity and expression (SOGIE), law reform of the crimes of sexual violence including rape, and universal access to comprehensive sexuality education.

Uploaded on December 15, 2022

This report is submitted by REDJUAMUGEN, The PACT and SRI and the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI). This report is the result of a consultation convened to contribute to the UPR in Guatemala, led and implemented by REDJUAMUGEN, was carried out through a multisectoral analysis. This identified the needs and demands of Guatemalan youth, guaranteeing the gender approach by investigating the current national situation in different sectors, forming a holistic analysis, then generating milestones to formulate recommendations for the country and the diverse Guatemalan youth.

Uploaded on November 03, 2022

In this joint submission, we examine the Government of South Africa’s human rights record since its third-cycle universal periodic review (UPR) in 2017. Specifically, we assess the government’s fulfilment of adolescent and youth sexual and reproductive health and rights. To this end, we analyse South Africa’s implementation of recommendations received relating to these issues and provide specific, action-orientated follow-up recommendations at the conclusion of this submission. Between the 9th and 10th of March 2022, 15 youth led, serving and focused organizations in South Africa convened in person and virtually to deliberate on how COVID-19 has affected the HIV, SRHR and GBV/F outcomes of adolescents and young people in their diversity.

Uploaded on November 03, 2022

This report has been jointly prepared by the African Sex Workers Alliance (ASWA), the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) and Sisonke, South Africa. It seeks to highlight the existing and ongoing human rights violations against sex workers due to restrictive and punitive laws and policies in South Africa It also outlines South Africa commitment to provision and protection of rights through various national and international mechanisms, including the previous cycle of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) and the relevant recommendations.

Uploaded on November 03, 2022

This report is submitted by Rutgers and the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) and focuses on sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and rights in The Netherlands. In general, SRHR in the Netherlands are well respected, however, challenges remain with regards to the provision of comprehensive sexuality education, the persistence of sexual violence and access to information, education, contraceptives and services for marginalized groups.

Uploaded on November 03, 2022

This report is submitted jointly by the Federation for Women and Family Planning, Poland and the Sexual Rights Initiative. The report focuses on violations of women’s sexual and reproductive rights in Poland and the stark impact of the restriction on abortion introduced in November 2020 that amounts to quasi total abortion ban in Poland. The report also addresses barriers in access to contraception, neglect and demonisation of comprehensive sexuality education, and the decrease in ante-natal care.

Uploaded on November 03, 2022

This report is jointly submitted by CREA and the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI). The report outlines the current legal and policy context as relates to sex work - and the threat posed by ongoing legislative and executive initiatives that conflate trafficking with voluntary adult sex work. It focuses on how criminalization of all forms of sex work harms sex workers in India, and violates their fundamental rights as contained in the Constitution of India and in international treaties and norms, exposing sex workers to violence, police harassment, and hindering access to justice and healthcare.

Uploaded on November 03, 2022

This submission, prepared ahead of the 4th Cycle of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) for the Republic of India, looks at the challenges faced by the adolescent and youth population in India in relation to their sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), HIV and human rights. Three key issues, in particular, that affect the country’s adolescents and young people, i.e., SRHR including abortion for adolescents and youth with disabilities and HIV (AL&YPLHIV) have been researched. The report also provides recommendations to the state of India with respect to these issues.

Uploaded on August 08, 2022

In response to the Special Rapporteur’s call for inputs on racism and the right to health, SRI made a submission advocating for an analysis of racism and the right to health addressing both racism and colonialism as determinants of health and as structural violence.

Uploaded on April 14, 2022

In response to the Special Rapporteur’s call for inputs on violence and its impact on the right to health, SRI made a submission addressing violations of bodily autonomy and the operation of systems of oppression as structural violence

Uploaded on December 16, 2021

The submission highlights the importance of an intersectional analysis that recognizes the ableist, sexist and patriarchal systems,structures and institutions that define productivity and dependency. Changes to these systems, structures and institutions will contribute to the realization of bodily autonomy, where persons with disabilities, and especially women with disabilities,have the ability to make and exercise choices not limited by oppression,discrimination, stigma, coercion, violence, lack of opportunities or possible consequences.

Uploaded on July 26, 2021

In response to the Special Rapporteur’s call for contributions, SRI made a submission locating the impact of COVID-19 on the right to sexual and reproductive health within a broader context of racial capitalism, patriarchy, colonialism, ableism and austerity.

Uploaded on June 10, 2021

Unaddressed, historical, structural and systemic discrimination and violence in the world create situations of crisis. Systems of patriarchy, racism and xenophobia and/or neoliberal capitalism created and continue to further and entrench this discrimination and violence increasing situations of crisis across the world. The impacts of any crisis on women and girls has to be addressed considering neoliberal policies that have defunded or privatized public health systems, eroded labour rights and other networks of protection, and promoted precarious forms of labour.[1]  At this moment in time, the multiple and intersecting crises the world has been experiencing for centuries have never been so visible. The economic crisis caused by COVID-19 has exposed the brokenness and inequality of global capitalism. These structural oppressions manifest in different crisis situations while exacerbating the existing forms of discrimination they cause. 

Uploaded on March 31, 2021

Colectivo Ovejas Negras; Akahatá – Equipo de trabajo en sexualidades y géneros; Synergia – Initiatives for Human Rigths; and the SRI – Sexual Rights Initiative, present the following alternative report to the Committee Against Torture. This report is aimed at contributing to the reviewing of the implementation of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment by the State of Uruguay.

Uploaded on March 01, 2021

This submission first suggests that the Committee should develop an intersectional analysis that recognizes the ableist, sexist and patriarchal systems, structures and institutions that define productivity and dependency. Secondly, it highlights how the full enjoyment of sexual and reproductive rights, broadly understood, redistributes resources, legitimacy, and power, therefore conditioning access to and keeping work. In reciprocity, access to work mediates the exercise of sexual and reproductive rights. The submission concludes by suggesting recommendations for structural changes to accessing work, health, education, and social protection systems.

Uploaded on January 27, 2021

This submission is made on behalf of 12 civil society organizations and individuals working on issues concerning gender, sexuality and migration from different perspectives. We commend the Committee on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families (CMW) for addressing the pressing issue of migrants’ rights to liberty and freedom from arbitrary detention and welcome the opportunity to provide inputs to the Draft General comment No. 5 (2020) on migrants’ rights to liberty and freedom from arbitrary detention in a very critical time given the COVID-19, discriminatory government response against the migrant workers during the pandemic and worryingly increasing incidents and crackdown against migrant workers globally. We believe that integrating a clear intersectional and gender analysis will further strengthen the draft general recommendation and set out some analysis and recommendation below for the Committee’s consideration.

Uploaded on January 27, 2021

This submission urges the Committee to clearly recognize that any deprivation of liberty resulting from discriminatory laws, regulation and policies or their discriminatory application is by definition arbitrary and breaches the right of equal protection before the law. Discriminatory laws, policies and regulations addressing migration and beyond have a disproportionate negative impact on migrant women, adolescents, sex workers, people living with HIV, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, gender non-conforming and intersex persons, persons with disabilities, and anyone who is perceived to have transgressed sexual and gender norms. In the context of migration and detention, such individuals and groups are more likely to suffer compounded rights violations. As a result, States cannot hold them in detention in relation to migratory measures and must always provide alternatives to detention.

Uploaded on January 27, 2021

The suggested changes to the General Recommendation proposed in this document are based on following overarching principles, a) the framework for any legislation, policy or programme including criminal laws to address trafficking should respect, protect and fulfill human rights and fundamental freedoms, b) prevention and elimination of human rights violations including trafficking is achieved by addressing root causes which include patriarchal norms c) any anti-trafficking measures undertaken should be in consultation with and participation of women and persons affected d) upholding women’s and girls’ autonomy should be the goal of all anti-trafficking measures.

Uploaded on January 27, 2021

This submission argues that the concept of trafficking should be debunked to give way to policies that ensure migrant rights and address migrant labour. In doing this, it deals with the definition of trafficking in the Convention and its consequent impact on women and girls, especially in the context of migration. The CEDAW Committee now has an opportunity to reframe the understanding of state obligations and standards on the issue of trafficking from a gender perspective, so that it is grounded in human rights and upholds bodily autonomy of women and girls.

Uploaded on January 27, 2021

This submission suggests the Committee (1) develops a comprehensive interpretation that recognizes the inextricable connection amongst the rights to peaceful assembly (ICCPR 21), freedom of expression (19), and freedom of association (22) and; (2) implements the strict tests of necessity and proportionality for restrictions of these rights. The lack of a cross-cutting standard for the restriction of these rights particularly affects those who are perceived to have transgressed sexual and gender norms.

Uploaded on December 16, 2020

This joint submission in response to the questionnaire by the Special Rapporteur provides context to the analysis on laws on violence against women. As a critical aspect to understanding laws on rape and other forms of sexual violence, this submission locates penal laws within the larger structural paradigm that dictates and influences the enactment and implementation of these laws and policies. It provides critical analysis of the harms of carceral approaches or approaches that rely on punishment and incarceration, when addressing gender-based violence. It argues that the report of the Special Rapporteur is an opportunity to lay down clear frameworks on consent and to counter paternalistic and essentialist discourses.

Uploaded on February 19, 2020

This submission reviews bioethics and how it has related to the rights of persons with disabilities. It first highlights how bioethics constitutes its own authority and experts to have a say in the lives of persons with disabilities. Secondly it provides a brief overview of a global feminist approach to bioethics and its contributions to a critique of the field. After highlighting the contributions of women with disabilities to the so-called “bioethical discussions,” the submission recommends to move away from bioethics and adopt a human rights-based analysis.

Uploaded on February 13, 2020

This submission is made by the Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI).[1] SRI is a coalition of national and regional organizations based in Canada, Poland, India, Argentina, Egypt and South Africa, that work together to advance human rights related to sexuality, gender and bodily autonomy at the United Nations.

Uploaded on May 22, 2019

Country: Ireland

Collaborators: SRI, Irish Family Planning Association

Key Words: Abortion; Criminalization; Right to Health; Discrimination

 

Country: Lithuania

Collaborators: SRI, Family Planning and Sexual Health Association

Key Words: Sexuality Education; Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights of Young People

 

Country: Venezuela

Uploaded on May 22, 2019

Country: Bolivia

Collaborators: SRI, Clayvert Alcon Saavedra

Key Words: Sexual Orientation; Gender Identity; Sex Work; Discrimination; Access to Health Services; Violence

 

Country: Bosnia and Herzegovenia

Collaborators: SRI, Organization Q

Key Words: Sexual Orientation; Gender Identity; Sexuality Education; Discrimination; Freedom of Expression; Violence

 

Country: Fiji

Uploaded on May 22, 2019

Country: Cambodia

Collaborators: SRI, People Health Development Association

Key Words: Sexual and Reproductive Rights of Young People; Sex Work; Sexual Violence; Sexual Transmitted Infections; HIV; Human Rights of Women; Discrimination Against Women; Gender-Based Violence

 

Country: Costa Rica

Collaborators: SRI, Mulabi-Costa Rica

Uploaded on May 11, 2019

This submission argues that the concept of trafficking should be debunked to give way to policies that ensure migrant rights and address migrant labour. In doing this, it deals with the definition of trafficking in the Convention and its consequent impact on women and girls, especially in the context of migration. The CEDAW Committee now has an opportunity to reframe the understanding of state obligations and standards on the issue of trafficking from a gender perspective, so that it is grounded in human rights and upholds bodily autonomy of women and girls.

Uploaded on May 07, 2019

The Sexual Rights Initiative (SRI) was created in 2006. Its aim is to create a political space for advocacy on sexual rights by bringing together feminist, LGBTI, southern and northern perspectives and incorporating diverse views without privileging particular experiences. The collaborating partners are Action Canada for Population and Development (ACPD), Creating Resources for Empowerment in Action (CREA), AKAHATA (Latin America), Coalition of African Lesbians (South Africa),the Polish Federation for Women and Family Planning, and the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights.

Uploaded on May 07, 2019

Many practices and norms that discriminate against women and other groups of people that have historically suffered discrimination and persecution are justified by reference to tradition, such as so-called honour killings, dowry-related violence and homophobic violence. Several States have taken actions to dismantle such traditional values, norms and practices, such as laws and programmes to end domestic violence and female genital mutilation, decriminalization of consensual sexual activity and media campaigns to counter homophobia.

Uploaded on May 01, 2019

The Human Rights Council initiative on ‘protection of the family’ is flawed in that it takes an unrepresentative view that elevates ‘the family’, while neglecting that families can be the site for human rights violations. For example, resolution 29/22 asserts that the family “is a strong force for social cohesion and integration, intergenerational solidarity and social development” (OP6). At the same time, there is no recognition that many families uphold power structures that oppress women, the elderly, children, persons with disabilities, queer and transgender youth, among others.

Uploaded on May 01, 2019

With the adoption of its landmark resolution 11/8, entitled “Preventable Maternal Mortality and Morbidity, and Human Rights”, the Human Rights Council has affirmed that the issue of maternal mortality and morbidity is a part of the global human rights agenda and has also placed the issue squarely within the Council’s own agenda. The resolution represents the first international intergovernmental recognition that maternal mortality and morbidity is a human rights issue.

Uploaded on May 01, 2019

Through this submission the SRI would like to highlight the links between adolescents’ sexual rights and education. Gender-based discrimination, social control over girls’ sexuality and sexual abuse lead to high drop out of girls from formal education systems. Discrimination against and humiliation of gender non-conforming and transgender children causes them to drop out as well. In South Asia, for example, intersex children are often given away to hijra communities who, facing social ostracization, live in poverty and are kept out of formal education systems.

Uploaded on May 01, 2019

Despite several initiatives to improve children’s health and reduce preventable mortality, including, among others, those undertaken to implement the Millennium Development Goals, the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Secretary General’s Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, several challenges remain. As noted in the Human Rights Council’s resolution 19/37, more than 7.6 million children under the age of 5 die each year, mostly from preventable and treatable causes.

Uploaded on May 01, 2019

The right to health is central to the achievement of sustainable development and the realization of all other human rights. This submission focuses on sexual and reproductive health, which are confirmed to be “integral elements of the right of everyone to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health” and yet, often marginalized; for instance, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) added target 5B on ‘universal access to reproductive health’ as late as 2006, and this target is among the ones least likely to be met by 2015.

Uploaded on May 01, 2019

Today, there are 1.8 billion young people between the ages of 10‐24 who should be guaranteed access to the comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services and sexuality education that they need for a healthy and fulfilling life. Regrettably, this is not the case.

Uploaded on May 01, 2019

Many practices and norms that discriminate against women and other groups of people that have historically suffered discrimination and persecution are justified by reference to tradition, such as so-called honour killings, dowry-related violence and homophobic violence. Several States have taken actions to dismantle such traditional values, norms and practices, such as laws and programmes to end domestic violence and female genital mutilation, decriminalization of consensual sexual activity and media campaigns to counter homophobia.